Thursday, January 24, 2019

Python in Education - Request for Ideas


The Python Software Foundation Board Committee for Python in Education wants to hear how the PSF can help members of our community increase the presence of Python in education.

Our first goal is to gather ideas from the community on ways the PSF can fund work to improve Python in education. We want to collect a broad spectrum of ideas and projects at all levels and in all disciplines. After the ideas phase, we will use the ideas provided to guide our request for proposals.

Timeline


Here’s the full timeline:
  • January 23- February 18, 2019: Request for Ideas phase
  • February 18 - March 31, 2019: Request for Proposals phase
  • April 1-17, 2019: Review process
  • April 18, 2019: Notify the accepted proposals
  • June-August of 2019: Accepted proposal work begins

Scope


The scope of the “request for ideas” phase is vague on purpose. We do not want to steer the ideas brought forth and want to see a wide variety of pitches.

Think small. If you had $100 USD what would you do?
Think BIG! If you had $10,000,000 USD what would you do?

There is no limit to the amount of money that your pitch might cost. If we think you have a great idea and it serves to improve Python in education, we will support it. Smaller requests will come from funds we have on hand. Larger funding requests will take more work to fulfill as we will work to gather funds through several methods such as donation drives and grants from other organizations.

While the Request for Ideas is vague and open ended, there are some guidelines. These guidelines will come into play during the Request for Proposal phase, but they may help you in the Request for Ideas phase.

Here are some things that we will look for and consider in a proposal:

Basic requirements


  • The criteria for acceptance will be based on the following guidelines:
  • Does the proposal adhere to PSF’s Code of Conduct?
  • Does the proposal align with the Python Software Foundation’s mission?
  • Is the proposal well organized and detailed? Be sure to tell us what the main issue, problem, or subject is and why is it important. 
  • Does the proposer have any experience relevant to the proposal? While not strictly a requirement, having previous experience in what is being proposed will be considered in the overall application.
  • Is the subject pertaining to underrepresented topics within our community? As we strive to improve the diversity of our community, priority will be given to proposals that bring new viewpoints and additional representation to the Python ecosystem.

Advanced requirements


  • The proposal should include a timeline and capture major milestones for the work being proposed.
  • If the proposal includes assistance from other contributors/resources, please share the details.
  • The proposal should include the expected outcomes of proposed work as well as metrics for how the outcomes will be evaluated.

Submit your ideas and questions to edu-committee@python.org.


Thank you for your time and we look forward to seeing all of the wonderful ideas!

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Python Software Foundation Fellow Members for Q4 2018

It's a new year and we are happy to announce our newest PSF Fellow Members!

Elana Hashman 

Alexander Hendorf 

Zachary Ware 

Jeff Triplett


Congratulations! Thank you for your continued contributions. We have added you to our Fellow roster online.

The above members have contributed to the Python ecosystem by maintaining popular libraries/tools, organizing Python events, contributing to CPython, and overall being great mentors in our community. Each of them continues to help make Python more accessible around the world. To learn more about the new Fellow members, check out their links above.

Let's continue to recognize Pythonistas all over the world for their impact on our community. Here's the criteria our Work Group uses to review nominations:

  • For those who have served the Python community by creating and/or maintaining various engineering/design contributions, the following statement should be true:
    • Nominated Person has served the Python community by making available code, tests, documentation, or design, either in a Python implementation or in a Python ecosystem project, that 1) shows technical excellence, 2) is an example of software engineering principles and best practices, and 3) has achieved widespread usage or acclaim.
  • For those who have served the Python community by coordinating, organizing, teaching, writing, and evangelizing, the following statement should be true:
    • Nominated Person has served the Python community through extraordinary efforts in organizing Python events, publicly promoting Python, and teaching and coordinating others. Nominated Person's efforts have shown leadership and resulted in long-lasting and substantial gains in the number and quality of Python users, and have been widely recognized as being above and beyond normal volunteering.
  • If someone is not accepted to be a fellow in the quarter they were nominated for, they will remain an active nominee for 1 year for future consideration.
  • It is suggested/recommended that the nominee have wide Python community involvement. Examples would be (not a complete list - just examples):
    • Someone who has received a Community Service Award or Distinguished Service Award
    • A developer that writes (more than one) documentation/books/tutorials for wider audience
    • Someone that helps translate (more than one) documentation/books/tutorials for better inclusivity
    • An instructor that teaches Python related tutorials in various regions
    • Someone that helps organize local meet ups and also helps organize a regional conference
  • Nominees should be aware of the Python community’s Code of Conduct and should have a record of fostering the community.
  • Sitting members of the PSF Board of Directors can be nominated if they meet the above criteria.

If you would like to nominate someone to be a PSF Fellow, please send a description of their Python accomplishments and their email address to psf-fellow at python.org. We are accepting nominations for quarter 1 through February 20, 2019. More information is available at: https://www.python.org/psf/fellows/.


Wednesday, January 09, 2019

2018 in review!


Happy New Year from the PSF! We’d like to highlight some of our activities from 2018 and update the community on the initiatives we are working on.

PyCon 2018


PyCon 2018 was held in Cleveland, Ohio, US. The conference brought together 3,389 attendees from 41 countries. We awarded $118,543 in financial aid to 143 attendees. In addition to financial aid, the conference continues to offer childcare for attendees, a newcomer orientation, a PyLadies lunch, and many more events.

Registration is now open for PyCon 2019: https://pycon.blogspot.com/2018/11/pycon-2019-registration-is-open.html .

Community Support


We initiated a Python Software Foundation Meetups Pro network at the end of the year, which supports 37 meetups in 8 countries and further expansion planned. The Sponsorship model allows the PSF to invite existing groups to the Meetup Pro network. The organizers no longer pay for the meetup subscription once they become part of the PSF network. This initiative will save approximately 32 hours of PSF staff time and 21 hours of meetup organizer time.

To help with transparency, the PSF launched its first newsletter in December! If you’d like to receive our next edition, subscribe here:  https://www.python.org/psf/newsletter/. You can read our first edition here: https://mailchi.mp/53049c7e2d8b/python-software-foundation-q4-newsletter

This year we formalized our fiscal sponsorship program to better support mission related projects. The PSF has signed fiscal sponsorship agreements with 8 groups including Pallets (Flask), PhillyPUG, PuPPy, PyCascades, PyHawaii, PyMNtos, PyArkansas, and the Python San Diego User Group. Through this effort, the PSF is able to support these projects by handling their accounting and admin work so the projects can concentrate on furthering their goals.

Python Package Index


Thanks to a generous award from the Mozilla Open Source Support program, the all new Python Package Index based on the warehouse codebase rollout was completed in April of 2018.

If you are interested in what the Packaging Group is currently working on, check out their RFP for security and accessibility development: http://pyfound.blogspot.com/2018/12/upcoming-pypi-improvements-for-2019.html.

Grants


The Python Ambassador program helps further the PSF's mission with the help of local Pythonistas.  The goal is to perform local outreach and introduce Python to areas where it may not exist yet. In March 2018, the board approved expanding our Python Ambassador program to include East Africa. Kato Joshua and the Afrodjango Initiative have been doing great outreach in universities in Uganda, Rwanda, and Kenya. 

In a general overview, $324,000 was paid in grants last year to recipients in 51 different countries. We awarded $59,804 more in grants in 2018 than 2017. That's a 22.6% increase for global community support.

Here is a chart showing the global grant distribution in 2018:

PSF Staff


In June Ernest W. Durbin III was hired as Director of Infrastructure. Ernest will be evaluating and strengthening internal systems, supporting and improving community infrastructure, and developing programs that benefit the Python community worldwide.

In September, the PSF hired Jackie Augustine as Event Manager. Jackie will be working with the team on all facets of PyCon and managing several community resources for regional conferences.

It is with great pleasure that we announce that Ewa Jodlowska will be the PSF's first Executive Director, starting January 1, 2019. Given her years of dedicated service to the PSF from event manager to her current position as Director of Operations, we can think of no one more qualified to fill this role as the PSF continues to grow and develop.


Community Recognition


Through out 2018, we presented several awards to recognize those that go above and beyond in our community. This year we gave out several Community Service Awards, a Distinguished Service Award, and a Frank Willison Memorial Award. To find out more about our awards or how to nominate someone for a Community Service Award, check out: https://www.python.org/community/awards/.

Community Service Awards

Chukwudi Nwachukwu was recognized for his contribution to spreading the growth of Python to the Nigerian community and his dedication and research to the PSF grants work group.

Mario Corchero was awarded a CSA for his leadership of the organization of PyConES, PyLondinium, and the PyCon Charlas track in 2018. His work has been instrumental in promoting the use of Python and fostering Python communities in Spain, Latin America, and the UK.

We also honored our Job Board volunteers: Jon Clements, Melanie Jutras, Rhys Yorke, Martijn Pieters, Patrice Neff, and Marc-Andre Lemburg, who have spent many hours reviewing and managing the hundreds of job postings submitted on an annual basis

Mariatta Wijaya was an awardee for her contributions to CPython, her efforts to improve the workflow of the Python core team, and her work to increase diversity in our community. In addition, her work as co-chair of PyCascades helps spread the growth of Python

Alex Gaynor received an award for his contributions to the Python and Django Communities and the Python Software Foundation. Alex previously served as a PSF Director in 2015-2016. He currently serves as an Infrastructure Staff member and contributes to legacy PyPI and the next generation warehouse and has helped legacy warehouse in security (disabling unsupported OpenID) and cutting bandwidth costs by compressing 404 images.

2018 Distinguished Service Award

The 2018 Distinguished Service Award was presented to Marc-Andre Lemburg for his significant contributions to Python as a core developer, EuroPython chair, PSF board member, and board member of the EuroPython Society.

2018 Frank Willison Memorial Award

The Frank Willison Memorial Award for Contributions to the Python Community was awarded to Audrey Roy Greenfeld and Daniel Roy Greenfeld for their contributions to the development of Python and the global Python community through their speaking, teaching, and writing.

Donations and Sponsorships


We'd like to thank all of our donors and sponsors that continue to support our mission! Donations and fundraisers resulted in $489,152 of revenue. This represents 15% of total 2018 revenue. PSF and PyCon sponsors contributed over $1,071K in revenue! 

This year we welcomed 17 new sponsors in 2018 including our first Principal Sponsors, Facebook and Capital One. Thank you for your very generous support.


We welcome your thoughts on how you’d like to see our Foundation involved in Python’s ecosystem and are always interested in hearing from you. Email us!

We wish you a very successful 2019!

Ewa Jodlowska
Executive Director

Betsy Waliszewski
Sponsor Coordinator